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Jaisingha's Laws of Nutrition
(Copyright  1981 & 2003)
 
By Ashok  T. Jaisinghani
 Alias Ashok Jaisingha
 
   Nutrition Therapy is better than any drug therapy because it is mainly based on the use of essential nutrients. Modern Medicine is not just what allopathy believes in. Modern Medicine does not begin and end with allopathy. Nutrition Therapy is not an alternative therapy as many allopathic and alternative therapists want us to believe. And Nutrition Therapy is not a subsidiary of allopathy. Nutritionists must stress the fact that there is absolutely no alternative to Nutrition. Unlike allopathy, Nutrition Therapy is the therapy of the first choice as we cannot live without food, just as we cannot survive without air and water. Before Nutrition Therapy, even allopathy is an alternative therapy.
 
   While trying to understand the interrelationships between various nutrients in the last 35 years, I have discovered many laws that operate in the sphere of Nutrition. I had published many of my discoveries about these laws, calling them Jaisinghani's Laws of Nutrition, in the year 1981. They are already copyrighted in my name since 1981. I now wish to call these laws as Jaisingha's Laws of Nutrition. Based on these laws, I have devised nutrition therapies that can cure many diseases, and even some forms of AIDS, very successfully. 
 
   Taking any nutrient in adequate amounts does not ensure that all the benefits due to that nutrient will be obtained. There are many factors that have to be considered to determine the level of need for each particular nutrient that a particular person requires at a particular time for his or her particular state of health, or disease, or for a particular result that is desired.
 
   Some factors increase the need for a nutrient, other factors reduce the need for it. The need for each nutrient is also influenced by the quantities of other nutrients that are taken. The actual requirement for a nutrient is dependent on the amounts of different groups of nutrients, like the synergists and antagonists, that are taken by a particular person. In most cases, the synergists reduce the need, and the antagonists increase the need, for a nutrient.
 
   Certain diseases increase the need for some nutrients and reduce the need for some other nutrients. In certain other diseases with different symptoms, the increase or reduction in the needs for the different nutrients may be just the opposite. Actually there are many diseases that are due to the excesses or the deficiencies of nutrients, or due to the wrong or incompatible combinations of nutrients, that are consumed.
 
   The classification of the different Laws of Nutrition mentioned here is not so clear-cut. Many of these laws have some common characteristics. These laws facilitate the understanding of the true nature of many processes of nutrition.
 
   Some of the Laws of Nutrition state facts that are very obvious, but unfortunately many pseudo-nutritionists have been spreading ideas that are contrary to these laws. These pseudo-nutritionists want others to believe that there are no definite laws in Nutrition. This wrong notion must be dispelled.
 
The Law on Combinations
 
   According to the Law on Combinations, the properties of a nutrient are modified when it is taken in combination with one or more nutrients with which it has biochemical affinity.
 
   For example, the B-complex is more effective and more useful when it is taken with vitamin A. Because vitamin A requires fat for its proper absorption and metabolism, the effectiveness of the B-complex, in terms of its retention and utilization in the body, is increased when it is taken with both vitamin A and fat. So, indirectly, at least, the retention and utilization of the B-complex is influenced by fat intake.
 
   Vitamin E taken with the B-complex has a counterbalancing, moderating effect on the oxidizing properties of the B-complex.
 
   Another example is that of taking salts of the basic minerals with vitamin A, vitamin E and fat. Vitamin A, vitamin E and fat help in increasing the absorption, retention and utilization of the basic minerals.
 
   Vitamin A and protein taken together are constipating, but when they are consumed separately at different times they need not cause constipation. Taken with protein, vitamin C tends to cause a laxative effect. The protein and vitamin C combination also tends to cause hyperacidity.
 
   Massive amounts of iron are absorbed by the body in the presence of potassium, but hardly any iron is absorbed when potassium is not present along with iron. In fact an inorganic iron salt like ferrous sulfate can cause a stomachache and a headache if it is not taken with a potassium salt like potassium chloride or potassium sulfate.
 
   There is another aspect to the Law on Combinations. There are a number of nutrients which cause great harm when they are taken separately, especially on an empty stomach. Some of the nutrients that can cause such harm are the B-complex, vitamin K, and mineral salts like ferrous sulfate, zinc sulfate and copper sulfate, as found in tablets. Taken separately on an empty stomach, some nutrients besides causing stomachache, headache and insomnia, can also cause problems like cough, cold, fever and diseases commonly considered as infections. Certain purified nutrients should therefore never be taken separately on an empty stomach. Some suitable food article should be taken at the same time with each of these nutrients.
 
   The same combination of nutrients can be beneficial or harmful under different conditions of health or disease. Many of the other Laws of Nutrition are directly or indirectly based on the Law on Combinations. The Law on Combinations is not actually a single clear-cut law. I have mentioned it as a law to stress the great importance of combinations in the sphere of Nutrition.
 
The Law on the Time Factor
 
   According to the Law on the Time Factor, when two or more nutrients with biochemical affinity are taken separately at different intervals of time, they produce an effect that is different, or is of less intensity, than the effect that is produced when they are taken together at the same time. The greater the time lag between the intakes of the two nutrients, the weaker is the effect that is produced.
 
   For example, taken together protein and vitamin A produce a constipating effect. The constipating effect goes on reducing with a greater and greater time lag between the intake of protein and the intake of vitamin A. So a protein-rich food taken at 9-00 a.m. and a vitamin A-rich food taken at 10-00 a.m. can produce a lesser constipating effect than they would if they are both taken at 9-00 a.m. or 10-00 a.m. A protein-rich food taken at 9-00 a.m. and a vitamin A-rich food taken at 1-00 p.m. can produce hardly any constipating effect.
 
   A patient, suffering from heart disease, who takes a large amount of vitamin A immediately after eating a meal rich in protein (and fat), can even collapse in a few minutes and die soon of a heart attack.
 
   Taken with a protein-rich food, a sufficient quantity of vitamin C causes an appreciable laxative effect and hyperacidity. But taken two or three hours before or after a protein-rich food, vitamin C can cause very little laxative effect and hyperacidity.
 
   Vitamin E taken at the same time with the B-complex tablets, prevents the harm due to the excessively strong oxidative effects of the B-complex. But taken two or three hours after the B-complex tablets, vitamin E is less effective as an antioxidant to counterbalance the oxidative effects of the supplementary B-complex.
 
The Law on Sequences
 
   According to the Law on Sequences, when two or more nutrients with biochemical affinity are taken in different orders of sequences, the effect that is produced in the case of each different sequence is different.
 
   For example, vitamin C and protein taken at 9-00 a.m. and vitamin A taken at 11-00 a.m. produce a laxative effect, but vitamin A and protein taken at 9-00 a.m. and vitamin C taken at 11-00 a.m. produce a constipating effect. Protein, vitamin C and vitamin A taken at the same time may produce neither a laxative effect nor a constipating effect. Of course, the effect will be decided more by the quantities of the two vitamins taken.
 
The Law on Synergism
 
   According to the Law on Synergism, when two or more nutrients producing a common effect in the body are taken together, the effect is much greater than that produced when the nutrients are taken separately at different times.
 
   For example, the following nutrients are constipating synergists:

   Vitamin A
   Vitamin E
   Vitamin K
   Vitamin B2 (riboflavin)  
   Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine)
   Niacin
   Tryptophan (an amino acid)
   Folic acid
   Protein
   Fat
   Some organic acids (like citric acid, but not vitamin C)
   Calcium
   Fluoride
   Chloride
   (Bromide)
   Nitrates and some other compounds of nitrogen
   Copper
   Etc.

   All of these nutrients taken together produce such a great constipating effect that even the worst forms of diarrhea and dysentery can be controlled or even cured with their help in a few hours! Even the most serious infectious type of diarrhea or dysentery is no match for this constipating combination. Of course, the toxins or chemicals that cause the diarrhea or dysentery must also be prevented from entering the body of the affected person.
 
   Various combinations of these constipating nutrients can be used for treating the symptoms and conditions related to diarrhea such as the damage to the gastrointestinal tract, dehydration, fever, low blood pressure, heart disease with low blood pressure, rapid loss of weight, chronic fatigue, diabetes (IDD), acidosis, gout, low levels of fat and cholesterol in the body, ulcers, ulcerous cancers, etc. The proper combination of these nutrients can even be used for treating AIDS associated with persistent diarrhea and related symptoms. 
 
   Another example is that of the laxative synergists such as:

   Vitamin C
   Vitamin D
   Thiamine (Vitamin B1)
   Pantothenate
   Sodium
   Potassium
   Magnesium
   Manganese
   Iodine
   Chromium
   Phosphates and some other compounds of phosphorus
   Zinc
   Etc.

   All of these nutrients taken together produce a very strong laxative effect, and are helpful in curing the worst forms of constipation.
 
   Various combinations of these laxative nutrients can be used for treating the symptoms and conditions related to constipation such as edema, high blood pressure, high levels of fat and cholesterol in the body, heart disease, some forms of cancer, chronic fatigue, diabetes (NIDD), leukemia, etc. The proper combination of these nutrients can even be used for treating AIDS associated with extremely severe constipation and related symptoms. 
 
   The energy synergists are as follows:

   Protein
   Fat
   Carbohydrate
   Some organic acids like fatty acids
   Alcohol
   Thermal energy or heat.

   The energy synergists produce a sparing effect for one another in providing the energy needs of the body.
 
   It must be noted that the synergism of two or more nutrients is for a specific effect only. Two or more nutrients may be synergists for one particular effect, but they may not be synergists for another particular effect. The synergists for one effect can even be antagonists for another effect. For example, vitamin A, fat and the basic minerals like magnesium, calcium, potassium and sodium are synergists in preventing and curing one type of acidosis in the body. But vitamin A, calcium and fat are antagonists of magnesium, potassium and sodium in their effects on the bowel movements, as vitamin A, calcium and fat are constipating factors, while magnesium, potassium and sodium are laxative factors.
 
   Thiamine and magnesium are synergists as laxative factors. But they are antagonists in maintaining the acid-base balance, as thiamine tends to increase acidity, while magnesium tends to reduce the acidity in the body.
 
   The nutrients and other biochemicals can be grouped together in many different ways to get the different synergistic effects, that is, effects that are stronger. So, there are blood pressure-lowering synergists, blood pressure-raising synergists, laxative synergists, constipating synergists, etc. There are many other synergetic groups of nutrients falling under different classifications.
 
   Taken in excess, the constipating factors with sodium (and water) are synergetic in raising the blood pressure.
 
   Thiamine, potassium and iodine are synergetic in lowering the blood pressure under certain conditions.
 
   Vitamin A, vitamin E and fat are synergetic in helping to increase the absorption, retention and utilization of the basic minerals.
 
   COROLLARY: The synergists cause a sparing effect on a person's need for each synergetic nutrient. Synergism reduces the need, as well as the tolerance, for each nutrient. So, most synergists help in moderating the deficiency of a nutrient that belongs to their group. This aspect of the Law on Synergism can as well be termed as the Law of Sparing Effect.
 
   The interchangeability between nutrients due to the sparing effect of synergism is not absolute in most cases. For example, greater amounts of the constipating factors - vitamin A, niacin, folic acid, protein, acids and fluoride - reduce the need for fat, but fat cannot be replaced completely by them. The substitution of one essential nutrient by another can only be partial. This is due to the fact that the synergists have a sparing action on the need for a nutrient for a particular effect only, while the nutrient is also needed for many other effects for which it is essential to the body.
 
The Law on Antagonism
 
   According to the Law on Antagonism, a nutrient producing a particular biochemical reaction in the body, reduces the effectiveness of an antagonistic nutrient in producing an opposite biochemical reaction, and therefore it also increases the need (as well as the tolerance) for the antagonistic nutrient. Conversely, the antagonistic nutrient also reduces the effectiveness of the nutrient and increases its need.
 
   For example, the constipating factors taken in larger amounts reduce the effectiveness of the laxative factors. So the need for the laxative factors increases proportionate to the increased intakes of the constipating factors. Therefore, the greater the intakes of vitamin A, vitamin E, vitamin K, Vitamin B2, Vitamin B6, niacin, tryptophan, folic acid, protein, fat, acids, calcium, fluoride, chloride, nitrate and copper, the greater is the need for vitamin C, vitamin D, thiamine, pantothenate, sodium, potassium, magnesium, manganese, iodine, chromium, phosphate, zinc, etc.
 
   An antioxidant like vitamin E is an antagonist of the B-complex factors, particularly thiamine and vitamin B12, which have oxidative properties. The larger the intake of vitamin E, the lesser is the effectiveness of the B-complex factors in the oxidative processes in the body, and so greater becomes the need for the B-complex. Actually, the oxidative processes are just slowed down. Conversely, the larger intakes of the B-complex factors, especially of thiamine and vitamin B12, reduce the effectiveness of the antioxidant property of vitamin E.
 
   The antagonism between nutrients is for a particular effect. The antagonists for one effect need not be antagonists for another effect. They can even be synergists for the other effect. For example, thiamine and sodium are antagonists in the maintenance of the blood pressure in the body, as thiamine tends to lower the blood pressure and sodium tends to raise the blood pressure. But they are synergists in producing a laxative effect. Likewise, niacin and sodium are antagonists in their individual actions on the intestines, as niacin is a constipating factor and sodium is a laxative factor. But niacin and sodium are synergists in raising the blood pressure. Vitamin C is an antagonist of magnesium, sodium and potassium in the acid-base balance, but vitamin C and these basic minerals are synergists as laxative factors.
 
   The antagonism between two nutrients in a particular biochemical reaction does not necessarily indicate that they are incompatible and cannot be taken together. A nutrient can even help in increasing the absorption, retention and metabolism of its antagonist. For example, vitamin A and fat, which are constipating factors, help in increasing the absorption, retention and metabolism of thiamine, magnesium, sodium and potassium, which are laxative factors.
 
   COROLLARY: Two or more antagonistic nutrients can be taken together in large amounts. It is possible to take high doses of the antagonists together because they can balance the two opposing tendencies. For example, large intakes of the constipating factors can be used with large intakes of the laxative factors. Large amounts of the B-complex factors, which have oxidizing properties, can be taken with a large amount of vitamin E, which is an anti-oxidant.
 
The Law on Combinations of Synergists and Antagonists
 
   According to this law, the need (as well as the tolerance) for a nutrient is reduced by the greater intakes of its synergists and also by the lesser intakes of its antagonists. Conversely, the need for a nutrient is increased by the lesser intakes of its synergists and by the greater intakes of its antagonists.
 
   For example, the need for vitamin C is reduced by the greater intakes (and assimilation) of the other laxative factors - vitamin D, thiamine, pantothenate, magnesium, manganese, sodium, potassium, iodine, chromium, phosphate, etc, as well as by the lesser intakes of the constipating factors - vitamin A, vitamin E, vitamin K, vitamin B6, niacin, tryptophan, folic acid, protein, fat, acids, fluoride, chloride, nitrate and copper. The need for vitamin C is increased by the lesser intakes of the other laxative factors as well as by the greater intakes of the constipating factors.
 
   The need for vitamin A is reduced by the greater intakes of the other constipating factors and by the lesser intakes of the laxative factors. The need for vitamin A is increased by the lesser intakes of the other constipating factors and by the greater intakes of the laxative factors.
 
   The need for iodine is reduced by the greater intakes of the other laxative factors and by the lesser intakes of the constipating factors. The need for iodine is increased by the lesser intakes of the other laxative factors and by the greater intakes of the constipating factors. 
 
   It is wrong to believe that a single nutrient can not affect much the metabolism of other nutrients. The greater or lesser intake of even a single nutrient can affect the metabolism of many other nutrients. Directly and indirectly, the metabolism of practically all the nutrients is affected by a change in the intake of even a single essential nutrient.
 
   The greater intake of vitamin A reduces the need for the other constipating factors and increases the need for the laxative factors. The lesser intake of vitamin A increases the need for the other constipating factors and reduces the need for the laxative factors.
 
   The greater intake of thiamine reduces the need for the other laxative factors and increases the need for the constipating factors. The lesser intake of thiamine increases the need for the other laxative factors and reduces the need for the constipating factors.
 
The Law on Ratios of Antagonists
 
   According to this law, when two antagonistic nutrients are taken, the higher than normal ratio of their intakes gives a result that is the opposite of the result that is given by a lower than normal ratio.
 
   For example, the thiamine to niacin ratio of 1 : 3 is laxative, while the thiamine to niacin ratio of 1 : 15 is constipating.
 
The Law on Ratios of Synergists
 
   According to this law, when two synergetic nutrients are taken together, the higher or lower intake of any one of the nutrients greatly increases or decreases the effectiveness of a common property of both.
 
   For example, 5000 I.U. of vitamin A is much more constipating taken with 50 gms of protein than 5000 I.U. of vitamin A taken with 25 gms of protein.
 
The Law on Correct Adjustments of Nutrients
 
   According to the Law on Correct Adjustments of Nutrients, when the intake of any nutrient (or nutrients) has to be increased or reduced, the intakes of other nutrients, particularly the intakes of its synergists and its antagonists should be adjusted (reduced / increased) on the basis of the particular biochemical effect or effects required, and by avoiding or minimizing the possible harmful side-effects.
 
   For example, if more vitamin A is taken for curing diarrhea, then the intakes of the other constipating factors may also be increased, or the intakes of the laxative factors may be reduced, or both the steps may be taken, that is, the intakes of the other constipating factors may be increased and the intakes of the laxative factors may be reduced. But when more vitamin A is required for curing night-blindness, and when there is no diarrhea, then the intakes of the other constipating factors may be reduced, or the intakes of the laxative factors may be increased, or both the steps may be taken, so that the bowel motions are of the same condition as before. The adjustments of the nutrients should be of such a nature that there is neither a tendency to constipation nor to diarrhea. When both diarrhea and night-blindness are present, the greater intake of vitamin A should be used along with the first alternative as in the case of diarrhea alone.
 
   If more magnesium (as magnesium sulfate or magnesium hydroxide) is taken to cure hyperacidity, and there is constipation too, the intakes of the laxative factors may be increased, or the intakes of the constipating factors may be reduced, or both the steps may be taken. But if more magnesium is taken to cure hyperacidity when there is no constipation, the intakes of some laxative factors like vitamin C, thiamine and iodine may be reduced, and the intakes of some constipating factors like vitamin A and fat may be increased, so that the bowel motions are not affected.
 
   It is not easy to make the proper adjustments in the intakes of all the nutrients. It may be easy to increase or reduce the intakes of some nutrients, but it may be difficult to do so in the case of other nutrients. So, it is more convenient to make the proper adjustments between the opposing groups of nutrients. A group of synergetic nutrients should be properly balanced with the group of their antagonists.
 
   The adjustments between nutrients are the most difficult when many biochemical processes have to be modified in the body. While getting some good effects that are needed, there may also be other effects which may be harmful, because of the less perfect adjustments between nutrients. The adjustments should be of such a type that the required benefits are obtained with the least amount of harm due to the side-effects.
 
The Law on the Cause of Excess of a Nutrient
 
   According to this law, the excess of a nutrient in the body is caused by the greater intake of the nutrient, or by the higher intakes of its synergists, or by the lower intakes of its antagonists, or by any two or all three of these alternatives.
 
   For example, the excess of vitamin A in the body is caused by the greater intake of vitamin A, by (the sparing effect of) the greater intakes of the other constipating factors (niacin, folic acid, fat, protein, acids, fluorine), and / or by the lesser intakes (and lesser assimilation) of the laxative factors (vitamin C, thiamine, magnesium, sodium, potassium, iodine).
 
   The excess of vitamin C in the body is caused by the greater intake of vitamin C, by the greater intakes (and assimilation) of the other laxative factors, and / or by the lesser intakes of the constipating factors.
 
   It is clear from the above examples that, in most cases, the excess of any nutrient in the body is a relative excess. The relative excess of a nutrient is caused by the greater intakes of its synergists and by the lesser intakes of its antagonists. The absolute excess of a nutrient is caused by a greatly excessive intake of the nutrient.
 
   The excess of a nutrient can be removed fast from the body by reducing the intakes of the nutrient and its synergists, and by increasing the intakes of its antagonists.
 
The Law on the Cause of Deficiency of a Nutrient
 
   According to this law, the deficiency of a nutrient in the body is caused by the lesser intake of the nutrient, or by the lower intakes of its synergists, or by the higher intakes of its antagonists, or by any two or all three of these alternatives.
 
   For example, the deficiency of protein is caused by the lesser intake of protein, by the lesser intakes of the other constipating factors, and / or by the greater intakes of the laxative factors.
 
   The deficiency of thiamine (vitamin B1) is caused by the lesser intake of thiamine, by the lesser intakes (and lesser assimilation) of the other laxative factors, and / or by the greater intakes of the constipating factors.
 
   In most cases, the deficiency of any nutrient is a relative deficiency. The relative deficiency of a nutrient is caused by the lesser intakes of its synergists and by the greater intakes of its antagonists. The absolute deficiency of a nutrient is caused by a very small intake of the nutrient.
 
   The deficiency of a nutrient can be removed fast from the body by increasing the intakes of the nutrient and its synergists, and by reducing the intakes of its antagonists.
 
The Law on the Effect of High Intakes of a Nutrient on Antagonists
 
   According to this law, the higher the intakes of a nutrient, the greater is the risk of development of relative deficiencies of the antagonists of the nutrient.
 
   For example, the higher intakes of vitamin A over a long period cause a constipating tendency and the deficiencies of the laxative factors.
 
   The higher intakes of vitamin C over a long period cause a laxative tendency and the deficiencies of the constipating factors.
 
   Large amounts of a nutrient should, preferably, not be taken over a long period as they can cause severe nutritional imbalances.
 
The Law on the Effect of Low Intakes of a Nutrient on Synergists
 
   According to this law, the lower the intakes of a nutrient, the greater is the risk of development of relative deficiencies of its synergists too.
 
   For example, the lower intakes of fat over a long period cause deficiencies of the constipating factors and a laxative tendency.
 
   The lower intakes of magnesium over a long period cause deficiencies of the laxative factors and a constipating tendency.
 
   Taking lower amounts of a nutrient over a long period causes deficiencies of its synergists because the antagonists become more effective.
  
The Law on Multiple Cross Excesses
 
   According to this law, when there are multiple cross excesses of both the constipating and the laxative factors in the body, the excesses of the constipating factors tend to be more dominant than the excesses of the laxative factors.

   The excesses of the constipating factors in the body cause constipation, which increases the urge for the greater intakes of laxative factors. Constipation also causes the greater retention of the laxative factors in the body. The greater intakes and greater retention of the laxative factors in the body, due to the excesses of the constipating factors, results in the development of multiple cross excesses.
 
   If the excesses of the laxative factors were more dominant than the excesses of the constipating factors in the body, there would be diarrhea, in which condition the body would tend to get deficiencies of the constipating factors. So, even though there may be excesses of both the laxative and the constipating factors in the diet, the diarrhea makes it difficult for the condition of multiple cross excesses to develop in the body.
 
   The multiple cross excesses, dominated more by the excesses of the constipating factors, cause the diseases associated with constipation, hypothyroidism and an anemia-like condition. The diseases associated with the multiple cross excesses should therefore be treated primarily by removing the excesses of the constipating factors. Once the excesses of the constipating factors are removed, it is easy to remove the excesses of the laxative factors too.
 
   For example, the excesses of the constipating factors in the body can lead to the greater intake of salt and to the greater retention of sodium and water in the body. That causes edema, high blood pressure and heart disease. When the intakes of the constipating factors are reduced, the retention of sodium and water are reduced in the body, and the conditions of edema, high blood pressure and heart disease get cured.
 
The Law on Multiple Cross Deficiencies
 
   According to this law, when there are multiple cross deficiencies of both the constipating and the laxative factors in the body, the deficiencies of the constipating factors tend to be more dominant than the deficiencies of the laxative factors.
 
   The deficiencies of the constipating factors in the body cause diarrhea, which reduces the urge for the intakes of the laxative factors. Diarrhea also causes reduction in the retention of the laxative factors in the body. The reduced intakes and the lesser retention of the laxative factors in the body, due to the deficiencies of the constipating factors, results in the development of multiple cross deficiencies.
 
   If the deficiencies of the laxative factors were more dominant than the deficiencies of the constipating factors in the body, there would be constipation, in which condition the body would tend to have excesses of the constipating factors. So, even though there may be deficiencies of both the laxative and the constipating factors in the diet, the constipation makes it difficult  for the condition of multiple cross deficiencies to develop in the body.
 
   The multiple cross deficiencies, dominated by the deficiencies of the constipating factors, cause the diseases associated with diarrhea. The diseases associated with the multiple cross deficiencies should therefore be treated primarily by removing the deficiencies of the constipating factors. Once the deficiencies of the constipating factors are removed, and the diarrhea is cured, it is easy to remove the deficiencies of the laxative factors too.
 
   For example, the deficiencies of the constipating factors in the body can lead to the lesser intake of salt and to the lesser retention of sodium and water in the body. That causes dehydration and low blood pressure. When the intakes of the constipating factors are increased, the intake of salt can also be increased. That results in the greater retention of sodium and water in the body and the conditions of dehydration and low blood pressure get cured.
 
The Laws on the Incompatibilities of Nutrients
 
   The classification of nutrients that are incompatible, is not on the basis of their antagonistic properties. Most of the antagonistic nutrients can be taken together as they are not incompatible. In most cases, the antagonists do not cause any harm when they are taken together. Taken together, some antagonists can even prevent harm that may otherwise be caused by the individual nutrients.
 
   Under the different conditions of health and disease, certain nutrients and their combinations are incompatible and cause harm to the body.
 
The Law on the Incompatibility of High Intakes of Synergists
 
   According to this law, the high intakes of a group of synergetic nutrients are incompatible for a healthy, normal person (unless they are counterbalanced with an antagonistic group of nutrients).
   For example, large intakes of the constipating factors make a healthy, normal person constipated and sick. They can also make a constipated person get a more severe constipation. Only a person suffering from diarrhea can benefit by taking large amounts of the constipating factors for some time till he becomes normal.
 
    The high intakes of the constipating factors can slow down the metabolic processes by making the organs of the body sluggish. They can cause symptoms and problems related to hypothyroidism and severe constipation, such as edema, high blood pressure and heart disease, some forms of cancer, chronic fatigue, diabetes (NIDD), leukemia, etc.
 
   Conversely, a normal, healthy person will get diarrhea by taking large amounts of the laxative factors. High intakes of the laxative factors can make diarrhea worse in a person who already has diarrhea. Only a person with constipation can benefit by taking large amounts of the laxative factors for some time till he becomes normal.
 
    The high intakes of the laxative factors speed up the metabolic processes making the organs of the body overactive. They can cause symptoms and problems related to hyperthyroidism and persistent diarrhea, such as the damage to the gastrointestinal tract, dehydration, fever, low blood pressure, heart disease associated with low blood pressure, rapid loss of weight, chronic fatigue, diabetes (IDD), ulcers and ulcerous cancers, gout, etc. 
 
   The intakes of large amounts of the oxidizing B-complex factors are "incompatible" (harmful) if they are not counterbalanced with large amounts of vitamin E, an antioxidant. Conversely, the intakes of large amounts of vitamin E are "incompatible" if they are not counterbalanced with large amounts of the B-complex. 
 
   The harm due to the large intakes of synergists can be prevented by counterbalancing them with the large intakes of their antagonists. However, this cannot be done indefinitely because, after certain levels, the high intakes of both the synergists and their antagonists can cause harm.
 
   In some cases, it is found that there are certain synergists that do not have antagonists in food in the ordinary sense. For example, the energy synergists - protein, fat, carbohydrate, alcohol and organic acids - do not have antagonists in food that can be termed as "anti-energy." The high intakes of the energy synergists are incompatible or harmful as they can cause obesity, high blood pressure and other problems.
 
The Special Incompatibility of the B-Complex

   According to this law, the high intakes of the B-complex, especially in the synthetic form, are incompatible under the following conditions:
   
   1. Taking the B-complex in high doses in tablets, or as yeast, without vitamin A (and fat).
 
    2. Taking the B-complex in high doses in tablets, or as yeast, with foods rich in protein, vitamin C and acids.
 
    3. Taking the B-complex tablets, or yeast, with the inorganic salts of iron without a potassium salt.
 
    4. Taking the B-complex tablets, or yeast, with some other factors found in tea, coffee, chocolate (cocoa), chillies and peppers, turmeric, coriander powder, other spices and condiments, some artificial sweeteners and colors, and pungent items like onion, garlic and radish.

   The intakes of large amounts of the oxidizing B-complex factors are harmful if they are not counterbalanced with large amounts of vitamin E, an antioxidant. The various incompatible combinations of the B-complex can cause different symptoms like hyperacidity, headache, cough, cold, allergy and even fever and diseases commonly considered as infections. 
 
   The comparatively smaller amounts of the natural B-complex factors, as found in most foods, which also contain vitamin E, are not incompatible with the other nutrients. Some of the synthetic B-complex factors used in tablets may be causing harm because they may be wrong derivatives of the vitamins. The B-complex tablets may also be causing harm due to their not containing some essential minerals which are found in the natural unrefined foods.
 
The Law on Sex Cycles
 
   According to the Law on Sex Cycles, the high intake of the B-complex group, especially in the synthetic form in tablets or as yeast, is incompatible with the intake of the food group rich in protein, vitamin C and acids, in the same sex cycle, even when the two groups are taken separately at different times or even on different days.
 
   Large amounts of the B-complex, when they are needed, should be taken in separate sex cycles, in which the foods rich in protein, vitamin C and acids are not taken. The detailed information about the influence of sex cycles is too much to be given in this article.
 
The Incompatibility of Iron Salts and Acids
 
   According to this law, the salts of iron, particularly in the inorganic form, are very harmful when they are taken with large amounts of acids, and especially when no salt of potassium is taken at the same time in an adequate quantity.
 
   The acids tend to reduce the absorption of iron by the body. An excess of acids reduces the body's tolerance for iron. When the common dietary acids, other than those like vitamin C, are taken in very large amounts, they tend to cause a greater than normal destruction of the red blood cells. In extreme cases, by causing the excessive destruction of the red blood cells, the excess of acids may even cause jaundice. 
 
The Law on Potassium and Iron
 
   According to this law, the greater the intake of potassium, the greater are the absorption of iron and the formation of red blood cells (RBCs), especially when both potassium and iron are taken at the same time. Conversely, the lesser the intake of potassium, the lesser are the absorption of iron and the formation of RBCs.
 
   The foods rich in both the potassium and iron are the best for the absorption of iron and the formation of RBCs. The ordinary acids work as antagonists of potassium in the processes involved in the absorption of iron and the formation of RBCs. The intake of acids should therefore not be so excessive that it prevents potassium from helping in the absorption of an adequate amount of iron and the formation of an adequate quantity of RBCs.
 
The Law on the Paradox of Acidosis
 
   According to this law, normally the higher intake of acids increases the acidity, and the higher intake of basic minerals (magnesium, calcium, sodium and potassium) decreases the acidity (or increases the alkalinity) in the body. But in the conditions of polycythemia, hyperthyroidism, gout and a type of diabetes mellitus, the higher intake of acids helps in reducing acidosis! and the higher intake of the basic minerals (especially of potassium) increases acidosis!
 
   The higher the intake of basic minerals in the conditions of polycythemia, hyperthyroidism, gout and a type of diabetes mellitus (IDD), the greater is the effectiveness of RBCs, thyroxine, and some other (laxative) biochemicals in the body, in splitting more protein, fat and carbohydrate to produce massive amounts of organic acids and in causing acidosis. So, the acidosis associated with these conditions should not be treated with the larger intake of basic minerals. The greater intake of basic minerals will make the acidosis worse. Only calcium seems to be the basic mineral in the sphere of biochemistry of the human body which may check acidosis to some extent under all conditions.
 
   The greater intake of acids is very important in reducing the effectiveness, and even the levels, of RBCs, thyroxine, and some other laxative biochemicals, the excesses of which cause acidosis in the body. The greater intake of acids can thus help in controlling and curing the acidosis associated with polycythemia, hyperthyroidism, gout and a form of diabetes mellitus.
 
   The acidosis can be cured by reducing the RBC count, lowering the thyroxine level by reducing iodine intake, by reducing the intake of vitamin D and by taking various other measures. 
 
   The intakes of the laxative factors like vitamin C, vitamin D, thiamine (vitamin B1), iodine, chromium, manganese, etc, should be reduced to prevent the massive breakup of protein, fat and carbohydrate, thus reducing the production of organic acids.
 
   I must, however, mention that the larger intakes of the other constipating synergists of acids - vitamin A, vitamin E, vitamin K, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, niacin, fluoride and nitrate - are also needed in controlling and curing acidosis.
 
   This should not be considered as the full explanation about the paradox of acidosis as the subject is very vast and needs more research.
 
The Law on the Effects of Acids
 
   According to the Law on the Effects of Acids, the greater the intake of acids, the greater is the tendency for getting anemia, hypothyroidism and constipation (and even leukemia if the folic acid intake is also high). Conversely, the lesser the intake of acids, the greater is the tendency for getting polycythemia, hyperthyroidism and diarrhea.
 
   It must be noted that the term "acids", as mentioned by me, does not include vitamin C, folic acid and the acidic derivatives of other vitamins. The term stands for the ordinary dietary organic acids, other than those that are vitamin derivatives.
 
Killer Combinations of Nutrients
 
   Preformed vitamin A forms  an incompatible  combination with  an iron salt.  The  high  doses of  vitamin A and an iron salt taken with protein, fat and acids form an instant killer. The addition of vitamin K, folic acid, copper, fluoride, nitrate and other constipating factors makes this killer combination even more extremely toxic. Even the strongest persons in the world cannot easily survive after taking these various combinations of instant killers. Such extremely dangerous combinations of nutrients must be declared as "POISONS" and banned all over the world.
 
   Taking high doses of mixtures of laxative salts like sodium sulfate, potassium sulfate and magnesium sulfate together with vitamin C and other laxative substances can make a person get very severe diarrhea, as in gastroenteritis, which can even cause death in a couple of days due to dehydration.
 
   Some cases of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) can be caused by various incompatible combinations of two or more of the following nutrients which may be consumed regularly in large amounts: vitamin A, vitamin K, (fat), protein, iron, copper, some B-complex factors, acids like citric acid and vinegar, nitrates and some other compounds of nitrogen used in foods as additives. Chinese hakka noodles, fortified with dangerous combinations of nutrients, and processed meats containing nitrites or nitrates, seem responsible for many of the cases of SARS in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore and some other countries. SARS causes death in many patients affected by it in a short period, as SARS is like one type of a fast-acting AIDS.
 
Many More Laws
 
   Hundreds of Laws of Nutrition can be formulated on the basis of the properties and effects of individual nutrients in various combinations with the other nutrients. There can also be many more laws which may be required to explain the various paradoxes that we come across in the sphere of Nutrition.
 

Copyright 1981 & 2003 by  Ashok  T. Jaisinghani

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